At Home without a Home

Im an artist. I live where I house sit. My closet is in my car.

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"I bought these shoes after going through my last pair. I had actually worn through the soles. I bought these shoes in a bit of a haste and got one size too big (it’s all they had). The shoes are great, but I’m willing to part with them. Size 11."

Kelly Sutton talking about his Diesel Boat Shoes ($90) which are featured on his website, cultofless.com.  These shoes are just one of the many items Sutton has decided to sell in “an attempt to own as little as possible.”  In 2010, Matthew Danzico published an article with the BBC, Cult of Less: Living out of a Hard Drive, which profiled not only Sutton but also, Chris Yurista. Yurista’s story holds a similar narrative to my own, he has gotten rid of the majority of his possessions to only what he can carry on his back.  His working life consists of full time work as a travel agent and moonlighting as a DJ.  He has ditched the records and plays from music files, turning the majority of his physical possessions to digital possessions.
Danzico ends the BBC article, Cult of Less: Living out of a Hard Drive, with an interesting conclusion.  If we have come to a point where technology and the internet have satisfied our need for a physical home and owning possessions, maybe it has has satisfied the need for having a physical body as well. Anders Sandberg, a research fellow at the Future of Humanity Institute at Oxford University, puts forth a theory about the future of the human race, “Dr Sandberg believes we could be living on hard drives along with our digital possessions in the not too distant future, which would allow us to shed the trouble of owning a body.” He calls this concept “mind uploading,” which would allow us to map our brains on the computer and essentially live forever without the need of an aging body.   

"I bought these shoes after going through my last pair. I had actually worn through the soles. I bought these shoes in a bit of a haste and got one size too big (it’s all they had). The shoes are great, but I’m willing to part with them. Size 11."

Kelly Sutton talking about his Diesel Boat Shoes ($90) which are featured on his website, cultofless.com.  These shoes are just one of the many items Sutton has decided to sell in “an attempt to own as little as possible.”  In 2010, Matthew Danzico published an article with the BBC, Cult of Less: Living out of a Hard Drive, which profiled not only Sutton but also, Chris Yurista. Yurista’s story holds a similar narrative to my own, he has gotten rid of the majority of his possessions to only what he can carry on his back.  His working life consists of full time work as a travel agent and moonlighting as a DJ.  He has ditched the records and plays from music files, turning the majority of his physical possessions to digital possessions.

Danzico ends the BBC article, Cult of Less: Living out of a Hard Drive, with an interesting conclusion.  If we have come to a point where technology and the internet have satisfied our need for a physical home and owning possessions, maybe it has has satisfied the need for having a physical body as well. Anders Sandberg, a research fellow at the Future of Humanity Institute at Oxford University, puts forth a theory about the future of the human race, “Dr Sandberg believes we could be living on hard drives along with our digital possessions in the not too distant future, which would allow us to shed the trouble of owning a body.” He calls this concept “mind uploading,” which would allow us to map our brains on the computer and essentially live forever without the need of an aging body.   

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